PSIO review and switch board installation – PS1 flashcart

PSIO box contents

I’ve been following the PSIO for some time now, but didn’t have quite enough interest to purchase one myself. At the moment they cost $149 Australian dollars. After you make the order it may take several months or more to be shipped.

Earlier this month I was contacted by a customer asking if I could install a PSIO switch board into their system. Because of that, I had the opportunity to install a PSIO switch board, and test out the flashcart itself. This post is a brief review of my experiences with the PSIO after a few hours of use. [Read More]

PM-41 (2) PSone MM3 modchip installation (PIC12F629)

In April I wrote a post about installing an MM3 modchip into my PSone with the original PM-41 board. I have also written a post about installing an MM3 modchip into my SCPH-7501 with the PU-22 board. This is a similar post, but covering the final revision of the PS1, the PM-41 (2) board.

Before I begin I’ll give you a little bit of background information. I purchased eleven PSone consoles on eBay with the goal of installing MM3 modchips, and reselling them for a decent profit. Out of the eleven consoles eight were the older PM-41 board design, and three were the newer PM-41 (2) board. [Read More]

SCPH-7501 PlayStation 1 MM3 modchip installation (PU-22 NTSC board)

SCPH-7501 PS1

In April I wrote a post on how to install a MM3 modchip into a PM-41 NTSC PSone console. This is a similar post, but covering anSCPH-7501 PlayStation 1 MM3 modchip installation. An MM3 modchip allows the PlayStation to boot directly to game backups burned to CDs.

MM3 modchips also allow you to run games from other regions. You can buy an MM3 chip for not a whole lot of money, they’re around $4-10. Cost primarily depending on how long you want to wait for your chip. Buying a chip from China is cheaper, but takes longer to arrive. I purchased my chip from a US seller on eBay preprogrammed and prewired for $8 shipped. [Read More]

SCPH-101 PSone teardown guide

In my last post I covered taking apart a PS2 slim. This post is a similar guide, but for Sony’s first slim console, the PSone. My goal is to have a SCPH-101 PSone teardown guide that’s more complete than the others available online.

I had already taken apart this PSone several times before taking these pictures, so yours may look slightly different. In particular, my PSone has a modchip installed which you can see in some of the pictures. I wrote another post on how I installed the modchip. [Read More]

SCPH-101 PSone MM3 modchip installation (PM-41 NTSC board)

MM3 modchip wiring

There are several ways to play game backups on the original PlayStation. One common method involves swapping a genuine disc for a backup disc while the system is running. Another method is to install a modchip that allows the PlayStation to boot directly to backups. This is a guide for PSone MM3 modchip installation.

An MM3 modchip will allow you to play your game backups, as well as games from other regions. You can get an MM3 chip for fairly cheap at around $4-10, I got mine from a US seller on eBay preprogrammed and prewired for $8 shipped. [Read More]

SCPH-101 PSone project introduction

PSone

In late 1995 Sony released their very first entry into the video game console market, the PlayStation. The PlayStation would go on to sell over 102 million units, making it one of the best selling video game consoles of all time, only being outsold by its successor, the PlayStation 2. At $299 the console was priced at $100 less than is main competitor at the time, the Sega Saturn. Later in late 2000 Sony began selling a slimmer version of the PS1 called the PSone, this is the start to a series of posts covering my SCPH-101 PSone project. [Read More]