Four switch Atari 2600 RGB mod installation guide (2600RGB)

It has been a while since my last post and I have a lot of projects I have completed since then that I haven’t written about. I plan on working backwards starting with the most recent mod I did. This post covers how to install the 2600RGB board into a four switch Atari 2600, which allows the Atari 2600 console to output RGB video, a huge improvement over the native RF video output.

What is RGB video?

In the United States most older video game consoles used either RF or composite video (coaxial cable like what you get cable TV out of, or the yellow/red/white cables) to output onto a TV. These video output options are passable on a CRT television, but on a digital HDTV it can look quite bad. [Read More]

XenoGC GameCube modchip installation

XenoGC installation

I’ve been selling XenoGC modchips for the Nintendo GameCube on my eBay store. I thought I’d write a guide on how to install the XenoGC.

The XenoGC is a popular modchip that allows you to do many things. It can directly boot both game backups and genuine games from any region. It will work on all GameCube models. The chip is fairly easy to install since it only requires soldering six points, no wires required.

The XenoGC source code was released in 2011, meaning if you wanted to you could make your own with an ATmega8L. I may end up doing this in the future, and writing a post about it. Right now you can find XenoGC chips available from places like eBay. [Read More]

Nintendo 64 (N64) RGB SCART video output using THS7374 amp

Nintendo 64 THS7374 amplifier installation

I recently bought an Open Source Scan Converter, or OSSC, primarily to make PlayStation 1 games look better on my display. After seeing how well RGB looked on the PS1, I had to try it on other consoles.

I already owned a Nintendo 64 and was using S-Video for video output, which is better than composite, but not great. When I installed the THS7374 amplifier into my SNES Jr. I bought an extra amplifier so I could do the same mod to my Nintendo 64. That’s what this guide covers, getting RGB SCART video output from the Nintendo 64. [Read More]

SNES Jr. (SNS-101) RGB SCART video output using THS7374 amp

SNES Jr. RGB amp installation

I recently bought an Open Source Scan Converter, or OSSC, primarily to make PlayStation 1 games look better on my display. After seeing how well RGB looked on the PS1, I had to try it on other consoles.

I ended up buying an SNES Jr. (SNS-101) for the improved visual quality from the 1-CHIP board design. The biggest downside of the original SNES Mini is that it doesn’t output RGB SCART out of the box, so I installed an THS7374 based amplifier, which is what this guide covers.

What is RGB video?

In the United States most older video game consoles used either RF or composite video (coaxial cable like what you get cable TV out of, or the yellow/red/white cables) to output video onto a TV. These video output options are passable on a CRT television, but on a digital HDTV it can look quite bad. [Read More]

PM-41 (2) PSone MM3 modchip installation (PIC12F629)

In April I wrote a post about installing an MM3 modchip into my PSone with the original PM-41 board. I have also written a post about installing an MM3 modchip into my SCPH-7501 with the PU-22 board. This is a similar post, but covering the final revision of the PS1, the PM-41 (2) board.

Before I begin I’ll give you a little bit of background information. I purchased eleven PSone consoles on eBay with the goal of installing MM3 modchips, and reselling them for a decent profit. Out of the eleven consoles eight were the older PM-41 board design, and three were the newer PM-41 (2) board. [Read More]

September update 2017

Last month I wrote an update for August 2017 where I summarized the posts I wrote in July, and listed some possible posts that could be published in August. This is a similar post, but for September 2017. I’ll talk about my plans for the month.

August post summary

Last month I wrote four posts, not including the update post. Topics included modchip installation on another PlayStation 1, and a more detailed guide on how to install custom firmware onto a PS3 slim using a Teensy. I also wrote my first electronics posts covering a DIY bench power supply, and how to make PCB schematics. [Read More]

How to make a PCB, part 1: making the schematic for Particle Photon RFM69 board

Particle Photon RFM69HCW schematic

Many of the projects I plan to cover in the future include designing and building custom PCBs. This is the first post in a series where I’ll be covering how to make a simple PCB, this post in particular covers the process of creating the schematic for the PCB. After this series is complete I’ll begin covering projects like my weather station, and a custom DDS function generator.

PCB design requirements

For this series I will be covering the process of making a PCB that connects a Particle Photon to an Adafruit RFM6HCW9 900MHz radio module.This is a very simple board which will give you a good introduction to PCB design. I will be using this same board as the indoor weather data receiver for my weather station project. [Read More]

SCPH-7501 PlayStation 1 MM3 modchip installation (PU-22 NTSC board)

SCPH-7501 PS1

In April I wrote a post on how to install a MM3 modchip into a PM-41 NTSC PSone console. This is a similar post, but covering anSCPH-7501 PlayStation 1 MM3 modchip installation. An MM3 modchip allows the PlayStation to boot directly to game backups burned to CDs.

MM3 modchips also allow you to run games from other regions. You can buy an MM3 chip for not a whole lot of money, they’re around $4-10. Cost primarily depending on how long you want to wait for your chip. Buying a chip from China is cheaper, but takes longer to arrive. I purchased my chip from a US seller on eBay preprogrammed and prewired for $8 shipped. [Read More]

DIY variable bench power supply with DPS5005 and LRS-150-48

Bench power supply front

I have used several power sources for my projects over the years. Things like wall warts, USB ports, ATX power supplies, and a laptop power supply plugged into a buck converter. These power sources are functional, but not ideal. This post covers the creation of a better bench power supply using a DPS5005 front end, and a LRS-150-48 power supply back end.

My bench power supply requirements

Here’s a list of things I was looking for in a power supply. I wanted something that was very flexible, so that it could be used for a wide variety of circuits. [Read More]

CECH-2001A PS3 slim custom firmware installation with Teensy

Teensy wired to PS3

In March I wrote a post about installing custom firmware onto a CECHA01 PS3 fat, and a CECH-2101A PS3 slim. This post goes into more detail on the same custom firmware installation process with a CECH-2001A PS3 slim console.

What is custom firmware, what is it used for, and what are the installation requirements

This section is a brief overview of the custom firmware background information I wrote about in my last PS3 custom firmware post. Custom firmware allows the PS3 to run homebrew software. With custom firmware a PS3 can do many things, including:

  • Create and run game backups.
  • Run emulators for other consoles.
  • Monitor temperatures, and control fan speeds.

Custom firmware installation requires a system that is running firmware 3.55 or earlier. This is because the encryption system on version 3.55 was cracked, allowing custom firmware updates to be seen as official software updates on consoles. Sony patched this issue in the next firmware release, and nothing released since has been hacked. [Read More]