Nintendo 64 (N64) RGB SCART video output using THS7374 amp

Nintendo 64 THS7374 amplifier installation

I recently bought an Open Source Scan Converter, or OSSC, primarily to make PlayStation 1 games look better on my display. After seeing how well RGB looked on the PS1, I had to try it on other consoles.

I already owned a Nintendo 64 and was using S-Video for video output, which is better than composite, but not great. When I installed the THS7374 amplifier into my SNES Jr. I bought an extra amplifier so I could do the same mod to my Nintendo 64. That’s what this guide covers, getting RGB SCART video output from the Nintendo 64. [Read More]

SNES Jr. (SNS-101) RGB SCART video output using THS7374 amp

SNES Jr. RGB amp installation

I recently bought an Open Source Scan Converter, or OSSC, primarily to make PlayStation 1 games look better on my display. After seeing how well RGB looked on the PS1, I had to try it on other consoles.

I ended up buying an SNES Jr. (SNS-101) for the improved visual quality from the 1-CHIP board design. The biggest downside of the original SNES Mini is that it doesn’t output RGB SCART out of the box, so I installed an THS7374 based amplifier, which is what this guide covers.

What is RGB video?

In the United States most older video game consoles used either RF or composite video (coaxial cable like what you get cable TV out of, or the yellow/red/white cables) to output video onto a TV. These video output options are passable on a CRT television, but on a digital HDTV it can look quite bad. [Read More]